This show was a dedication to clean water and the rivers that feed into Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage.  Downstream  was on display at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Alaska, February 2-25, 2018.  .......  For two weeks last spring, I joined a group of filmmakers, writers, conservationists, and nonprofit leaders to travel from Poulsbo, Washington to Juneau, Alaska, aboard the 97’ wooden cruising vessel  Sea Wolf,  based out of Glacier Bay. The goal was to discuss water quality, transboundary mining issues, forestry, fisheries, climate change, and see how the Inside Passage is changing. We stopped along the way to interview people willing to share their view of life along the coastal waterways: native leaders fighting for land and water rights, to keep their traditions and ways of life; scientists studying the intricacies of intact ecosystems; fishermen and families who rely on healthy salmon returns; poets reflecting on and challenging language to understand stressed environments; and law makers speaking to the difficulties of policy and international relationships.  I joined the crew as naturalist and artist, and was given the opportunity to share what I know of Southeast Alaska, my home, as well as my understanding gleaned through making art - of ice, land, loss and how we adapt and survive. While on board, we experimented with different ways of looking at landscapes and investigated interconnections between people, places, and objects.  This work is inspired by our journey. It is a dedication to, and celebration of, clean water and the rivers that define life along the Inside Passage. Using found materials, scrap metal, and encaustic; these small vignettes showcase the beauty and importance of clean water.  Included in this show are five glacially fed salmon rivers in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. The rivers length determined the size of each piece; one metal plate represents approximately five river miles. In collaboration with  Salmon Beyond Borders -  a campaign driven nonprofit working to defend and sustain our transboundary rivers, jobs, and ways of life - next to each river is a description of these complex arteries that carve their way to the Pacific Ocean.    10% of all purchases will be donated to Salmon Beyond Borders. For more information, visit  www.salmonbeyondborders.org .    Special thanks to Kimber Owen and the crew on the  Sea Wolf , Jill Weitz and Erin Heist with  Salmon Beyond Borders , Ryan Peterson and Cary Carmichael Case for the use of their photography, and to all who are working to protect clean water.

This show was a dedication to clean water and the rivers that feed into Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage. Downstream was on display at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Alaska, February 2-25, 2018.

.......

For two weeks last spring, I joined a group of filmmakers, writers, conservationists, and nonprofit leaders to travel from Poulsbo, Washington to Juneau, Alaska, aboard the 97’ wooden cruising vessel Sea Wolf, based out of Glacier Bay. The goal was to discuss water quality, transboundary mining issues, forestry, fisheries, climate change, and see how the Inside Passage is changing. We stopped along the way to interview people willing to share their view of life along the coastal waterways: native leaders fighting for land and water rights, to keep their traditions and ways of life; scientists studying the intricacies of intact ecosystems; fishermen and families who rely on healthy salmon returns; poets reflecting on and challenging language to understand stressed environments; and law makers speaking to the difficulties of policy and international relationships.

I joined the crew as naturalist and artist, and was given the opportunity to share what I know of Southeast Alaska, my home, as well as my understanding gleaned through making art - of ice, land, loss and how we adapt and survive. While on board, we experimented with different ways of looking at landscapes and investigated interconnections between people, places, and objects.

This work is inspired by our journey. It is a dedication to, and celebration of, clean water and the rivers that define life along the Inside Passage. Using found materials, scrap metal, and encaustic; these small vignettes showcase the beauty and importance of clean water.  Included in this show are five glacially fed salmon rivers in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. The rivers length determined the size of each piece; one metal plate represents approximately five river miles. In collaboration with Salmon Beyond Borders - a campaign driven nonprofit working to defend and sustain our transboundary rivers, jobs, and ways of life - next to each river is a description of these complex arteries that carve their way to the Pacific Ocean.

10% of all purchases will be donated to Salmon Beyond Borders. For more information, visit www.salmonbeyondborders.org.

Special thanks to Kimber Owen and the crew on the Sea Wolf, Jill Weitz and Erin Heist with Salmon Beyond Borders, Ryan Peterson and Cary Carmichael Case for the use of their photography, and to all who are working to protect clean water.

_DSC1906.jpg
IMG_5209.jpg
IMG_5216.jpg
Stikine
Stikine

80 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

25 x 35" Framed

Private Collection

---

“The Great River” in the Tlingit language, is the fastest free-flowing navigable river in the United States. It supports all five species of Pacific salmon with an average run of 40,000 Chinook salmon, as well as 20 other fish species.

Of its 400 miles, 40 miles are within the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness.

The Coastal Tlingit used the river as a transportation route and continue to rely on it for subsistence fishing.

The Stikine is a part of the Sacred Headwaters, along with the Nass and Skeena Rivers in British Columbia.

The force of the current in the river's Grand Canyon section limits salmon migration to the lower one-third of the river.

The Stikine corridor has Alaska’s greatest richness in amphibian species. Six native species are documented at the river’s mouth: three salamanders, two frogs, and the Western Toad.

_DSC1837.jpg
Iskut
Iskut

30 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

18 x 18" Framed

Silver leaf, pencil, found images, paper, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The largest tributary of the Stikine River, the Iskut River supports critical spawning, rearing, and migration habitat for all five species of Pacific salmon and steelhead.

The Iskut-Stikine watershed covers nearly 20,000 square miles, larger than the country of Switzerland.

The wetland at the confluence of the Stikine and Iskut is home to thousands of migratory birds, moose, mountain goats, wolves, and bears.

The Iskut-Stikine watershed is the traditional home of the Tahltan First Nation.

_DSC1857.jpg
Taku
Taku

10 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

5 x 17" Framed

Silver leaf, pencil, paper, photographs, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

Running approximately 50 miles, the Taku River hosts all five species of Pacific salmon, and is the largest producer of Chinook and Coho salmon in the region.

The river valley is part of the traditional territory of the Taku River Tlingit First Nation, encompassing the entire 4.5 million acre watershed, extending from the Yukon Territory to the Alaska panhandle.

Each year a large glacial outburst flood, or jökulhlaup, occurs when the glacially impounded Tulsequah Lake breaches its confines. The resulting flood results in high water levels, low temperatures, and a tremendous load of debris.

About 90% of the Taku River watershed lies within Canada.

Chilkat
Chilkat

10 metal plates, 2.5" x 3" each

14 x 7" Framed

Ink, silver leaf, paper, found imagery, blueberry-dyed gauze, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The Chilkat River is 52 miles long, hosting all five species of Pacific salmon.

Home of the Chilkat Tlingit, the village of Klukwan is situated along the banks of the river.

One translation of Chilkat in the Tlingit language is “storage container for salmon,” or “salmon storehouse,” for the warm upwelling that occurs keeping the river from freezing.

Up to 4,000 bald eagles descend on a five-mile stretch of river in early winter to take advantage of abundant salmon. The Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve was created in 1982

Chinook escapement numbers are currently the lowest on record.

_DSC1324.jpg
Unuk
Unuk

16 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

13 x 14" Framed

Silver leaf, paper, photographs, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The Unuk, along with the Chickamin River, produce the largest natural runs of Chinook salmon in southern Southeast Alaska.

At just over 80 miles, the Unuk supports a culturally important run of eulachon, also called hooligan.

The river flows into Misty Fjords National Monument Wilderness, which contains the largest designated wilderness area in Tongass National Forest.

Chinook escapement numbers are currently the lowest on record.

 This show was a dedication to clean water and the rivers that feed into Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage.  Downstream  was on display at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Alaska, February 2-25, 2018.  .......  For two weeks last spring, I joined a group of filmmakers, writers, conservationists, and nonprofit leaders to travel from Poulsbo, Washington to Juneau, Alaska, aboard the 97’ wooden cruising vessel  Sea Wolf,  based out of Glacier Bay. The goal was to discuss water quality, transboundary mining issues, forestry, fisheries, climate change, and see how the Inside Passage is changing. We stopped along the way to interview people willing to share their view of life along the coastal waterways: native leaders fighting for land and water rights, to keep their traditions and ways of life; scientists studying the intricacies of intact ecosystems; fishermen and families who rely on healthy salmon returns; poets reflecting on and challenging language to understand stressed environments; and law makers speaking to the difficulties of policy and international relationships.  I joined the crew as naturalist and artist, and was given the opportunity to share what I know of Southeast Alaska, my home, as well as my understanding gleaned through making art - of ice, land, loss and how we adapt and survive. While on board, we experimented with different ways of looking at landscapes and investigated interconnections between people, places, and objects.  This work is inspired by our journey. It is a dedication to, and celebration of, clean water and the rivers that define life along the Inside Passage. Using found materials, scrap metal, and encaustic; these small vignettes showcase the beauty and importance of clean water.  Included in this show are five glacially fed salmon rivers in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. The rivers length determined the size of each piece; one metal plate represents approximately five river miles. In collaboration with  Salmon Beyond Borders -  a campaign driven nonprofit working to defend and sustain our transboundary rivers, jobs, and ways of life - next to each river is a description of these complex arteries that carve their way to the Pacific Ocean.    10% of all purchases will be donated to Salmon Beyond Borders. For more information, visit  www.salmonbeyondborders.org .    Special thanks to Kimber Owen and the crew on the  Sea Wolf , Jill Weitz and Erin Heist with  Salmon Beyond Borders , Ryan Peterson and Cary Carmichael Case for the use of their photography, and to all who are working to protect clean water.
_DSC1906.jpg
IMG_5209.jpg
IMG_5216.jpg
Stikine
_DSC1837.jpg
Iskut
_DSC1857.jpg
Taku
Chilkat
_DSC1324.jpg
Unuk

This show was a dedication to clean water and the rivers that feed into Southeast Alaska's Inside Passage. Downstream was on display at Alaska Pacific University in Anchorage, Alaska, February 2-25, 2018.

.......

For two weeks last spring, I joined a group of filmmakers, writers, conservationists, and nonprofit leaders to travel from Poulsbo, Washington to Juneau, Alaska, aboard the 97’ wooden cruising vessel Sea Wolf, based out of Glacier Bay. The goal was to discuss water quality, transboundary mining issues, forestry, fisheries, climate change, and see how the Inside Passage is changing. We stopped along the way to interview people willing to share their view of life along the coastal waterways: native leaders fighting for land and water rights, to keep their traditions and ways of life; scientists studying the intricacies of intact ecosystems; fishermen and families who rely on healthy salmon returns; poets reflecting on and challenging language to understand stressed environments; and law makers speaking to the difficulties of policy and international relationships.

I joined the crew as naturalist and artist, and was given the opportunity to share what I know of Southeast Alaska, my home, as well as my understanding gleaned through making art - of ice, land, loss and how we adapt and survive. While on board, we experimented with different ways of looking at landscapes and investigated interconnections between people, places, and objects.

This work is inspired by our journey. It is a dedication to, and celebration of, clean water and the rivers that define life along the Inside Passage. Using found materials, scrap metal, and encaustic; these small vignettes showcase the beauty and importance of clean water.  Included in this show are five glacially fed salmon rivers in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. The rivers length determined the size of each piece; one metal plate represents approximately five river miles. In collaboration with Salmon Beyond Borders - a campaign driven nonprofit working to defend and sustain our transboundary rivers, jobs, and ways of life - next to each river is a description of these complex arteries that carve their way to the Pacific Ocean.

10% of all purchases will be donated to Salmon Beyond Borders. For more information, visit www.salmonbeyondborders.org.

Special thanks to Kimber Owen and the crew on the Sea Wolf, Jill Weitz and Erin Heist with Salmon Beyond Borders, Ryan Peterson and Cary Carmichael Case for the use of their photography, and to all who are working to protect clean water.

Stikine

80 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

25 x 35" Framed

Private Collection

---

“The Great River” in the Tlingit language, is the fastest free-flowing navigable river in the United States. It supports all five species of Pacific salmon with an average run of 40,000 Chinook salmon, as well as 20 other fish species.

Of its 400 miles, 40 miles are within the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness.

The Coastal Tlingit used the river as a transportation route and continue to rely on it for subsistence fishing.

The Stikine is a part of the Sacred Headwaters, along with the Nass and Skeena Rivers in British Columbia.

The force of the current in the river's Grand Canyon section limits salmon migration to the lower one-third of the river.

The Stikine corridor has Alaska’s greatest richness in amphibian species. Six native species are documented at the river’s mouth: three salamanders, two frogs, and the Western Toad.

Iskut

30 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

18 x 18" Framed

Silver leaf, pencil, found images, paper, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The largest tributary of the Stikine River, the Iskut River supports critical spawning, rearing, and migration habitat for all five species of Pacific salmon and steelhead.

The Iskut-Stikine watershed covers nearly 20,000 square miles, larger than the country of Switzerland.

The wetland at the confluence of the Stikine and Iskut is home to thousands of migratory birds, moose, mountain goats, wolves, and bears.

The Iskut-Stikine watershed is the traditional home of the Tahltan First Nation.

Taku

10 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

5 x 17" Framed

Silver leaf, pencil, paper, photographs, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

Running approximately 50 miles, the Taku River hosts all five species of Pacific salmon, and is the largest producer of Chinook and Coho salmon in the region.

The river valley is part of the traditional territory of the Taku River Tlingit First Nation, encompassing the entire 4.5 million acre watershed, extending from the Yukon Territory to the Alaska panhandle.

Each year a large glacial outburst flood, or jökulhlaup, occurs when the glacially impounded Tulsequah Lake breaches its confines. The resulting flood results in high water levels, low temperatures, and a tremendous load of debris.

About 90% of the Taku River watershed lies within Canada.

Chilkat

10 metal plates, 2.5" x 3" each

14 x 7" Framed

Ink, silver leaf, paper, found imagery, blueberry-dyed gauze, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The Chilkat River is 52 miles long, hosting all five species of Pacific salmon.

Home of the Chilkat Tlingit, the village of Klukwan is situated along the banks of the river.

One translation of Chilkat in the Tlingit language is “storage container for salmon,” or “salmon storehouse,” for the warm upwelling that occurs keeping the river from freezing.

Up to 4,000 bald eagles descend on a five-mile stretch of river in early winter to take advantage of abundant salmon. The Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve was created in 1982

Chinook escapement numbers are currently the lowest on record.

Unuk

16 metal plates, 2.5 x 3" each

13 x 14" Framed

Silver leaf, paper, photographs, and encaustic on scrap metal

---

The Unuk, along with the Chickamin River, produce the largest natural runs of Chinook salmon in southern Southeast Alaska.

At just over 80 miles, the Unuk supports a culturally important run of eulachon, also called hooligan.

The river flows into Misty Fjords National Monument Wilderness, which contains the largest designated wilderness area in Tongass National Forest.

Chinook escapement numbers are currently the lowest on record.

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